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Posts Tagged ‘Design

Here are some cool shirts from my good friend Chris! Check em out!!!

One of the hardest things to convince clients of is that design is more
than just the pretty skin that is draped over a solution at the end to
make it look pretty. It is more than make-up or aesthetics. Design for
me, is a modus operandi, it is an attitude to problem solving that not
just compliments the scientific approach but it also
fuels the process. “Making it pretty” is not design, never was, never
will be.
It’s merely putting lipstick on a pig. Making it pretty is the
polar opposite to design thinking.

The first place I learnt design thinking was at the Caribbean School of Architecture. That way of thought is the most valuable skill I have in my lil’ arsenal.

not Photoshop,

not Illustrator,

not Indesign or any other program that I know how to use.

The critical thought required to creatively solve a problem or to
deliver new ideas takes a whole lot more than pushing pixels. Disecting
a brief, distilling the elements and desiging an appropriate response
begins long before I fire up my tool of choice on the computer. The NY
Times article makes excellent points on the design thinking approach and
it’s place in the workplace. Good to see that this is finally, truly,
hitting the main stream media.

Unboxed – Design Is More Than Packaging – NYTimes.com

“Design thinking is inherently about creating new choices, about divergence,” says Tim Brown, the chief executive and president of the design consulting firm IDEO, based in Palo Alto, Calif. “Most business processes are about making choices from a set of existing alternatives. Clearly, if all your competition is doing the same, then differentiation is tough. In order to innovate, we have to have new alternatives and new solutions to problems, and that is what design can do.”

grain

Posted on: October 6, 2008

One of the most interesting things I learned while studying Architecture, was what you can learn from the “grain” of a settlement. This could be as small as a village or as big as a teeming metropolis. The grain tells the story of a city. Where it started, how it grew, how it’s growing, who’s in charge. Where’s the money, where’s poverty, how do they live.

So when I saw these pictures on Boston.com’s Big Picture one after the other I just had to put them up. Very interesting to just study how these communities work just from one picture.


Village in the Rheris Valley, Er Rachidia region,
High Atlas Mountains, Morocco. Fortified villages are frequently seen
along the valley of the Rheris, as they are on most rivers of southern
Morocco, inspired by the Berber architecture built to protect against
invaders. Today, with the threat of raids now gone, the close
clustering of dwellings, small windows, and roofs covering houses and
narrow streets serve the purpose of protecting occupants from heat and
dust. The flat, connecting roofs also provide a place for drying crops.

Village on the banks of an arm of the River Niger, Mopti region, Mali.

One of the main messages from this grain is that most if not all the people here have no cars.

30 THINK ON PAPER
“Use often-ignored tools called a felt-tip pen and sketchbook first, then a scanner, then various applications – the usual suspects. My tip is to think with a pen and paper first, then use computers. It will lead to a stronger, more original voice.”
SUPPLIED BY: JEREMYVILLE

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Loving the new clean look of TechCrunch.com for all the hoopabaloo that happened with his last design. I am not sure I liked it too much. For me what makes a site design memorable and appropriate is simply this.

If you were to take away text, would you know that this is a site about the business of technology. Seriously. Ask yourself that question. Design is not subjective my friends, design should be honest and true to the task @ hand.

This is the first in a series of posts on design. On the, elements of design. Nothing to do with Photoshop brushes or textures, or cool vectors or styles. Just design at it’s most elemental state. Taking fundamentals and introducing them with current examples. Number one:

SCALE

Regardless of how simple the form, color or texture, scale can take a minimalist form and make it into something incredible. It is by far, one of the most powerful elements a designer can use.

from Walt Disney Animation Studios – Glagos Quest

https://i1.wp.com/www.dignubia.org/maps/timeline/img/b2600b-pyramids-giza.jpg

Pyramids at Giza


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